May Life Bloom Like a Blossom – “Vital Blooming: Hu Ke-min Retrospective” will be held in Taipei on 16 Feb

TAIPEI, TAIWAN
– Media
OutReach – 14 February 2022 – An opening is to be held on February
16, at 3 p.m., for “Vital Blooming: Hu
Ke-min Retrospective” at the Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall’s Bo-Ai Gallery where it
is due to run until March 2.

Hu stands out as one of the traditional Chinese painting
masters who relocated from mainland China to Taiwan in the late 1940s. He is
best known for his bird-and-flower painting and copies of Dunhuang murals. On
display at this exhibition are nearly 140 works; alongside the “Chromatic
Color,” “Achromatic
Color,” and “Dunhuang Frescoes” series are a number of snow landscapes and
calligraphic pieces.

Also
featured are “Hundred Flowers” and “Ink and Wash Vegetables” Hu created in 1958
and 1978 respectively. Of the former, a collection of ink and wash sketches of
Taiwan’s great variety of exotic or rare flowers, readily appealing to the eye
are his calligraphic touches and boneless painting rendition. A masterly
combination of sketch and freehand brushwork painting, the later series depict
36 vegetables common in daily diets.

This
exhibition can be traced all the way to the ecstatically palpitating experience
of Madame Li Zhong-hua, the
curator, when she stood before a Mayling orchid painting of Hu’s for the first
time years ago. She went on to study painting under Hu’s tutelage and thus had
the opportunity to follow her mentor’s subsequent artistic career up close and
personal. Collecting Hu’s works over the years has been her way to cherish Hu’s
memory. And now she aspires to extend Hu’s artistic life by getting the world
to rediscover his works. To share her treasured aesthetic experience with the
younger generation and hopefully with posterity, Li has
also put together Hu’s lifetime of works onto the Internet (https://hukemin-portfolio.mystrikingly.com/). Her
last wish is to make real her mentor’s—return some of Hu’s works to Changzhou,
Jiangsu province on the mainland and house them in a memorial museum in his
hometown.

 

Comments are closed.